Review: The Southern Po’ Boy Cookbook

Before I moved to New Orleans, I had never even heard of a po’ boy. There were sandwiches, hoagies, subs, clubs and heroes…but no po’ boy. My first po’ boy was devoured at a restaurant on Bourbon Street whose name I unfortunately cannot recall. It was my first day in New Orleans and we had been strolling around the French Quarter for a while when we passed an open restaurant on Bourbon and the heady aroma of fried seafood made us realize how hungry we were.

I don’t remember what anyone else ordered, but I got a 12 inch Fried Oyster Po’ Boy fully dressed and a huge plate of French fries. I devoured almost all of it before I couldn’t breathe anymore and went back to our hotel room to change for the night, but I passed out from a severe case of “food coma” because I had never eaten so much fried food in my entire life. For those of you who have never enjoyed the plethora of fried pleasures that can be had in our town, believe me when I tell you to take it slow your first time out. Not even a bucket of fried chicken from KFC will prepare you for the hurt you can experience from a ton of fried oysters on French bread with mayo…not that I’m complaining. I’ve had many a po’ boy since.

Anyhow, all that reminiscing brings me to Todd Micheal St. Pierre’s latest, The Southern Po’ Boy Cookbook: Mouthwatering Sandwich Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans. This cookbook is filled with a multitude of po’ boy recipes, along with gorgeous photos, colorful artwork by local painter Dianne Parks, and of course, Todd’s well-written stories and poems. I adore the creative chapter titles like “International Affairs,” “The Unusual Boys” and “Boy Oh Boy: If It Swims, Cook It!”. Even the fun names for individual po’ boys are a hoot like “The Gert Town” which is a pork tenderloin po’ boy with Remoulade sauce and “The Who Dat” (Geaux Saints!) which has New Orleans-style BBQ Shrimp. My favorite part, though, was that Todd starts the whole book off with the key ingredient of any po’ boy worth its salt, a recipe for “Baby, I Knead You! Homemade Po’ Boy Bread.”

Considering I am a food writer, I’ve eaten a majority of the po’ boys featured in this book, from “The Kenner,” a ham and Swiss to “The Snug Harbor” with fried green tomatoes and shrimp remoulade. But there were a few I’d never seen before that set my mouth to watering as I read on. For example, I’d love to sink my teeth into “The Pacific Northwest” with baked salmon and wasabi mayo or “The French Canadian,” a poutine po’ boy with French fries and cheese curds.

I think The Southern Po’ Boy Cookbook is easily the sexiest, most visually stunning of all Todd Micheal St. Pierre’s cookbooks. But, there was just one thing about it that didn’t make sense to me. For people who don’t live in the Greater New Orleans Area, this cookbook is a valuable jewel, one that can transport you to my beloved city with some fresh, juicy shrimp and a ton of butter. But me? I am lucky enough to live here in this wonderfully unique town and if I want a po’ boy, I can walk around the corner and get one anytime I want. Sorry Todd! You know I love ya, but you also know anyone who lives in this town is already spoiled rotten when it comes to po’ boy access.

Speaking of around the corner, this Sunday, November 24th, Oak Street will be hosting its annual Po-Boy Festival where restaurants all over the city will offer some of the most unique, tongue-tingling, stomach-satisfying po’ boys ever and I couldn’t be more excited. Plus, Todd Micheal St. Pierre will be signing copies of The Southern Po’ Boy Cookbook from 2-3pm in front of Blue Cypress Books at the fest! See ya there!

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